Fire Resistance of Composite Deck Slabs
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Fire Resistance of Composite Deck Slabs

The Structural Engineer
Fire Resistance of Composite Deck Slabs
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The fire resistance of composite deck slabs is presented in terms of their loadcarrying capacity, integrity, and thermal insulation. It is shown that 90 min fire resistance can be achieved with mesh reinforcement in the slab, provided the slab and reinforcement are continuous over a number of supports and imposed loads do not exceed 6.7 kN/m2. This was demonstrated by large-scale tests, and a summary of available UK test data is made. In other cases of design, the fire engineering method may be used. This takes account of the reduced strength of the elements in fire. G.M.E. Cooke, R.M. Lawson and G.M. Newman

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 16

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