Informal Study Group 'History of Structural Engineering': Summer Meeting in Glasgow, July 1988
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Informal Study Group 'History of Structural Engineering': Summer Meeting in Glasgow, July 1988


The Structural Engineer
Informal Study Group 'History of Structural Engineering': Summer Meeting in Glasgow, July 1988
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

After visits in previous years to Bristol, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Paris, and Manchester, this year the History Group chose Glasgow for its annual 3-day study meeting. Arrangements were made from London by Julia Elton and John Bancroft, as before, while this time our invaluable Scottish helpers were mainly Roland Paxton and Gordon Masterton. On the evening of our arrival, they set up an exhibition of drawings and old photographs and outlined the visits they had planned for the next 3 days.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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