Definition of a Good Code
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Definition of a Good Code

The Structural Engineer
Definition of a Good Code
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

There has been much said and written recently about the vexed question of Codes of Practice. Such is the intensity of emotion aroused that we have seen the setting up of the rival ‘permissible stress’ Code group who have written their own Code in place of the (apparently) much unloved ‘limit state’ Code. The fact that this is a concrete Code is of no particular significance, since similar reactions have been experienced with respect to all the new ‘limit state’ Codes which have been published so far (in the UK at 1east)- similar, that is, in terms of the level of anger at their increased complexity and the replacement of comprehended engineering parameters by non-dimensionalised mathematical criteria. J.E. Dibley

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 11

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