The CEB (Comité Euro-International du Béton): its Nature and Work
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The CEB (Comité Euro-International du Béton): its Nature and Work


The Structural Engineer
The CEB (Comité Euro-International du Béton): its Nature and Work
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

For many years, almost from its inception in fact, this Institution has supported the CEB. Originally, the support was to two distinguished Fellows - Prof. A. L. L. Baker and Dr. F. G. Thomas - who were directly involved with CEB. Later, the support was to the British National Committee of CEB in the form of an annual contribution; this situation still obtains. R.E. Rowe

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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