Design Charts for Reinforced and Prestressed Fibre Concrete Elements
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Design Charts for Reinforced and Prestressed Fibre Concrete Elements


The Structural Engineer
Design Charts for Reinforced and Prestressed Fibre Concrete Elements
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

Empirical equations based on experimental data and suitable for design office use are presented for estimating the strength of steel fibre-reinforced concrete elements in shear. Illustrative examples and design aids are given. I.Y. Darwish and R. Narayanan

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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