Some Aspects of Semi-Rigis Connections in Structural Steelwork
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Some Aspects of Semi-Rigis Connections in Structural Steelwork


The Structural Engineer
Some Aspects of Semi-Rigis Connections in Structural Steelwork
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

It has long been convenient to assume ‘pinned’ or ‘fixed’ connections to simplify analysis for steel frame design. Until recently, there has been little interest in research on real behaviour of joints because of mathematical complexity of solutions. However, there is a revitalised interest in this topic because of cheap computing power and new Codes highlighting a number of grey areas of design. This paper discusses the effect of joints on a number of structures and attempts to show, by use of fixity factors and a modified moment distribution method, that analysis need not be difficult and that, even when full connection data are not known, the techniques may provide qualitative data of great practical value in many cases. R. Cunningham

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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