Docklands - Canary Wharf. The Redevelopment of Canary Wharf, 1985-1991
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Docklands - Canary Wharf. The Redevelopment of Canary Wharf, 1985-1991

The Structural Engineer
Docklands - Canary Wharf. The Redevelopment of Canary Wharf, 1985-1991
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

In late 1984, a consortium of financial companies joined together to initiate master planning for the redevelopment of Canary Wharf, located in London’s Docklands, to create a modem zone of infrastructure and new office buildings to serve as a new centre for financial trading. The consortium, Canary Wharf Development Companies (CWDC), including First Boston Properties, Credit-Suisse, and Morgan Stanley International, engaged the architectural-engineering firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) in January 1985 to work with themselves and the London Dockland Development Corporation (LDDC) in developing: (1) an overall masterplan for the entire project; (2) the architectural-engineering construction documents for the entire infrastructure works; and (3) prototypes for some of the initial office building blocks which were to be developed. D.S. Korista and J.G. Burns

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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