Experiences in the Physical and Chemical Examination of Concrete

Author: Worsdale, J E

Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Back to Previous

Experiences in the Physical and Chemical Examination of Concrete

The Structural Engineer
Experiences in the Physical and Chemical Examination of Concrete
Date published

N/A

Author

Worsdale, J E

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Worsdale, J E

In these days the synthetic side of concrete technology receives a tremendous amount of
attention, dealing as it does with the state of the materials and the methods whereby certain results can be obtained. It is, however, with the converse of these methods I wish more particularly to deal in this paper, i.e., the analytical treatment, when the start is made with the result in the form of a piece of concrete. Physical and chemical tests are then applied with the object of reconstructing in detail its formation and history, from the time when it was in separate constituents, through the period of mixing, the curing period immediately following its set, and thence t0
the time of examination.

J.E. Worsdale

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 10

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
<h4>Architecture in Concrete</h4>

Architecture in Concrete

The British Portland Cement Association have just issued a charmingly illustrated brochure, containing 36 illustrations of artistic concrete structures, showing the possibilities of concrete that are being taken advantage of by the American architect.

Price ‐ £9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>"Some American Comparisons"</h4>

"Some American Comparisons"

As a young English engineer visiting U.S.A. and Canada for the first time I found very much to interest me. On every side one sees progressiveness, efficiency and a readiness to revise building regulations and structural practices to keep abreast of the times. In a very few weeks I became aware that we in England are falling behind our American confreres-not because our engineers or architects are less intelligent or efficient, but seemingly because we are hemmed in by hide bound authorities, regulations and old established practices. In these days of fierce competition in the field of foreign trade, when every extra cost in building finds its way by overhead charges to the cost of our manufactures, it is the duty of us all "ruthlessly to scrap all methods and machinely which do not come up to the most modern standard" -to quote the words of the Prince of Wales, who as a well travelled young man is constantly appealing for a change of ideas in Britain. G.S. Bowers

Author ‐ Bowers, G S
Price ‐ £9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>Correspondence "The Status of the Structural Engineer"</h4>

Correspondence "The Status of the Structural Engineer"

To the Editor of The Structural Engineer. Sir,-I have read with great interest the article in The Structural Engineer for September dealing with the status of the structural engineer, and I am in thorough agreement with it. The question now arises how to obtain the recognition of his status.

Price ‐ £9