The Behaviour of Purlins Subject to Wind Uplift (an Assessment of EC3: Part 1.3)

Author: Leach, P;Robinson, P

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The Behaviour of Purlins Subject to Wind Uplift (an Assessment of EC3: Part 1.3)

The Structural Engineer
The Behaviour of Purlins Subject to Wind Uplift (an Assessment of EC3: Part 1.3)
Date published

N/A

Author

Leach, P;Robinson, P

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Leach, P;Robinson, P

The behaviour of purlins subject to wind uplift has never addressed in British Standards or Codes of Practice but, completion of EC3, design rules are now available. This assesses the competitiveness of such methods when compared the traditional 'design by testing' approach, and illustrates this new 'state-of-the-art' design method appears to be conservative by about 30%.

P. Leach and P. Robinson

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Format:
PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 14

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