Continuing Professional Development
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Continuing Professional Development

The Structural Engineer
Continuing Professional Development
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

My career started in the early 1950s when the whole process of education and training was quite different to the process today. There were a greater number of ways in which one could obtain professional qualifications, since it was not until 1972 that the profession decided to emphasise graduate entry only.

Peter Campbell

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Feature Issue 19

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