The Black Country Route - Structural Aspects of the Walsall Section

Author: Mordey, A G

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The Black Country Route - Structural Aspects of the Walsall Section

The Structural Engineer
The Black Country Route - Structural Aspects of the Walsall Section
Date published

N/A

Author

Mordey, A G

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Mordey, A G

This paper deals with the structures on the section of the Black Country route contained within the boundaries of the Walsall Metropolitan Borough Council, and the process by which the design of the structures has evolved, as influenced by the complex ground conditions that exist over the length of the site. The scheme is currently under construction, hence the difficulties which are being encountered, and the solutions to the problems arising from them, will be described.

A.G. Mordey

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 17

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