Discussion on The London Ark, Hammersmith by Mr. R.H. Jackson and Mr B. Leidner
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Discussion on The London Ark, Hammersmith by Mr. R.H. Jackson and Mr B. Leidner


The Structural Engineer
Discussion on The London Ark, Hammersmith by Mr. R.H. Jackson and Mr B. Leidner
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

Mr J. E. A. Tapsell (M), (Tapsell Wade & Partners) This is a very tantalising building, still 'shrouded in mystery'. The paper refers, in very general terms, to the steel structure, and I hope that the authors will be able to give more details about the actual steel frame. I am interested in the combined steel and concrete floor, the connections used between the floor beams and the steel columns, the stability bracing in the lift and stair towers, and a more detailed plan (if possible) of the stair and lift areas. I should like to know how the steel stanchions and bracing were clad.

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