ADR: Why Treat the Symptom, not the Cause?
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ADR: Why Treat the Symptom, not the Cause?


The Structural Engineer
ADR: Why Treat the Symptom, not the Cause?
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

Structural engineers appointed as the engineer on civil engineering contracts have sought to maintain a fair and independent approach to differences that arise on site. The quasi-arbitral duties called for in those contracts can no longer be performed. In order to ensure the early resolution of disputes and thereby save the parties‘ costs, it is essential to introduce a form of mediation that provides for the regular intervention of neutral persons to assist in the resolution of disputes during the course of the works. Three processes are advocated - a board of three members for large and complex projects; an advisor for the less complex; and a mediator on call where retention throughout the works is not justified by the cost. The procedures are incorporated into the contract conditions, and the board or individuals are appointed at the outset of the contract. K. Severn and P.L. Campbell

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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