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The Structural Engineer
Verulam
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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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Wind over Christmas
Nick Cook has reverted to the daunting topic of BS6399 in all its subtleties. He writes from St. Albans:
Your anonymous correspondent of 18 August VOL76 No. 16 is not quite the 'Looney' he fears, since both his points are very important and formed the subject of lengthy debate in the drafting committee. The answer on BSI committee composition is simple: the drafting committee B/525/1/2 was composed of 3 'wind engineers' that know the subject and 4 design engineers that have to apply the standard - 6 chartered. This was supervised by B/525/1 that comprised industry representatives, including one from this Institution.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 23/24

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