Better Construction Through the Potential of Timber I-Beams

Author: Turnbull, D B;Milner, M W;Mettem, C J

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Better Construction Through the Potential of Timber I-Beams

Better Construction Through the Potential of Timber I-Beams
The Structural Engineer
Author

Turnbull, D B;Milner, M W;Mettem, C J

Date published

N/A

Author

Turnbull, D B;Milner, M W;Mettem, C J

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Quality manufactured timber I-beams (also known as ‘I-joists’) have been frequently and successfuily in use in Scandinavia and North America for more than two decades.

D.B. Turnbull, M.W. Miller and C.J. Mettem

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 15

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