The British Airways London Eye Introduction
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The British Airways London Eye Introduction

The Structural Engineer
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The five papers presented in this issue of The Structural Engineer catalogue an experience like no other for the team who were privileged to work together on the Eye. None of us will ever forget the chance to exercise every scrap of engineering experience we had ever accumulated, or the frantic project pace. There were endless journeys, floods of ideas, and designs solved on trains, in airport lounges and on flights. There were days and nights of working but all characterised by a team spirit
and desire to win that never faltered. It was a particular privilege for those of us from the UK to work with European colleagues and observe their approach and professionalism. And for all of us, it was wonderful to see the pride of the shop floor and site workers and their obvious interest in being part of such a great enterprise. In his television appearance, the Chief Executive of British Airways, Bob Ayling, commented that the project was a model of just what can be achieved with the right atmosphere.

Allan Mann

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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