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The Structural Engineer

This paper compares the effective dynamic pressures from BS 6399 Loading for Buildings: Part 2: Code of practice for wind loads: 1997 (BS 6399: 2) Bristol against the previous practice defined by CP3: V: 2: 1972 (CP 3). The calibration was performed for 485 sites around the coastline and over 2500 sites inland. In order to represent current practice fairly, it uses the most common (mis)interpretations of CP 3. The results show that using the simplest, most conservative options, BS 6399: 2 gives 5% lower Values on average and 12% higher values as the typical worst case, while using the optimum options, BS 6399: 2 gives 16% lower values on average and 1% higher values as the typical worst case. Professor N.J. Cook

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Author – Cook, N J

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The Structural Engineer

In March 1998 a ’profile’ of Francis Walley appeared in The Structural Engineer. In a subsequent issue (in Verulam), where there was a discussion on journal contents, a member from Rio de Janeiro protested that it should not include ‘a profile of an eminent retired engineer, aged nearly 80, whose most notable work appears to have been in the assessment of bomb-damaged buildings in the war‘. It was with some trepidation that I accepted the request to give the Sutherland History Lecture. F. Walley

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The Structural Engineer

Ruminations of an RE Francis Beale writes regularly, producing interesting snippets related to site control. Thus he has warned of the need for speed when grouting tendons in warm climates, has referred to problems with large, joint-less concrete pours, has commented on different types of engineering contract and explained how he found that hair cracks in reservoirs are often best left well alone as they tend to be self-healing, though Arab farmers were only too delighted if a reservoir was pumped out!

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