Reinforced Concrete Cooling Towers

Author: Gueritte, A T J

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Reinforced Concrete Cooling Towers

The Structural Engineer
Reinforced Concrete Cooling Towers
Date published

N/A

Author

Gueritte, A T J

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Gueritte, A T J

One of the most striking applications of reinforced concrete during the last few years has been in the shape of large cooling towers which are a most prominent and impressive feature in some of the power-stations recently erected or developed in this country under the general scheme of electrification of the Central Electricity Board. A.T.J. Gueritte

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 3

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