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Correspondence

The Structural Engineer
Correspondence
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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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SIR,-Mr. Wollaston, in his letter in the current number of The Structural Engineer, has apparently forgotten the subject of the discussion. His remarks on the distortion of the box are not relative to the point at issue, and I do not propose to follow his lead by entering into a discussion on the distribution of internal stresses in foundation blocks.

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Opinion Issue 8

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