Pai Lin Li Travel Award 2009 - Interlocking stabilised soil blocks: Appropriate technology that does
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Pai Lin Li Travel Award 2009 - Interlocking stabilised soil blocks: Appropriate technology that does

The Structural Engineer
Pai Lin Li Travel Award 2009 - Interlocking stabilised soil blocks: Appropriate technology that does
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This paper looks at the use of Interlocking Stabilised Soil Block (ISSB) technology in the less economically developed world, particularly focusing on the current work in Uganda. The paper takes the reader through the history behind ISSB technology and how advancements in equipment as well as an increased nongovernmental organisation (NGO) presence in recent years have allowed the technology to be much more widely used in local communities. Central to this paper is a critical look at the advantages of ISSBs over fired bricks. It looks at several projects which have employed ISSB technology and how environmentally friendly technology can be made available to rural communities while still meeting rigorous building standards. The paper tries to highlight not just the economic or the technological advances, but also the positive environmental and socio-economic benefits of using ISSB technology. Ewan Smith, MEng, CEng, MIED

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 15/16

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