Jointless Concrete Roads and Walls

Author: Walker, J H

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Jointless Concrete Roads and Walls

The Structural Engineer
Jointless Concrete Roads and Walls
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Walker, J H

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The new development in concrete road construction,whereby roads and pavements built on the “Anchorete” system are laid without joints, visible cracks, or warping, is dealt with in the booklet "Concrete Roads, Past, Present and Future.” J.H. Walker

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 10

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