The Erection of Sydney Harbour Bridge

Author: Lewis, J Stuart

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The Erection of Sydney Harbour Bridge

The Structural Engineer
The Erection of Sydney Harbour Bridge
Date published

N/A

Author

Lewis, J Stuart

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Lewis, J Stuart

The contract for the construction of the bridge across Sydney Harbour was secured in 1924 by Dorman Long & Co., Ltd ., and the accepted design embraces 10 steel girder
approach spans, five on each side of the harbour -and an arch span of 1,650 ft. over the harbour, the total 1ength of the steel construction, including the approach spans, being 3,770 ft.

J. Stuart Lewis

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 5

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