An All-Welded Gasometer
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An All-Welded Gasometer

The Structural Engineer
An All-Welded Gasometer
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The gasometer erected for the Southern Oil Co., Ltd., at Trafford Park, Manchester, is, in. plates, as far as can be ascertained, the first all-welded gasometer in this country, and marks a distinct step forward in the advance of welding.

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PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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