Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 62): Robustness

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers’ Health and Safety Panel

Date published

2 May 2017

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Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 62): Robustness

The Structural Engineer
Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 62): Robustness
Date published

2 May 2017

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers’ Health and Safety Panel

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers’ Health and Safety Panel

Article No. 55 in this series discussed structural safety and highlighted ‘robustness’ as a key attribute. The demand that structures be ‘robust’ is enshrined in building regulations, yet it causes difficulties because, unlike other safety attributes, it is not a quality easily defined by mathematical equation. Hence, there are problems for designers in knowing what to do (and how much to provide) and there are problems for regulators in verifying that what is provided is sufficient. Many safety issues on site can be traced back to a failure to assure robustness in temporary works.

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Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Managing Health & Safety Risks Issue 5

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