Editorial: Designing for fire resistance - a task for us all

Author: R. Plank

Date published

2 January 2018

Price
Free
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Editorial: Designing for fire resistance - a task for us all

The Structural Engineer
Editorial: Designing for fire resistance - a task for us all
Date published

2 January 2018

Author

R. Plank

Price

Free

Access Resource
Author

R. Plank

The Grenfell Tower tragedy in London last June was a stark reminder of how rapidly a fire can spread and the horror which it can cause. In the wake of this disaster, the UK construction industry is actively examining what can be done to minimise the risk of similar tragedies in the future. It is likely that one of the recommendations will be a clearer identification of responsibilities, but whatever the outcome it will clearly be helpful for all members of the design team to have a good understanding of all aspects of fire safety, as well as detailed knowledge about those aspects under their direct control.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 1

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