Five examples of environments where footfall analysis can be demonstrated effectively

Author: Oasys

Date published

24 January 2023

Five examples of environments where footfall analysis can be demonstrated effectively

Tag
Author
Date published
Price
Blog
Author

Oasys

Date published

24 January 2023

Author

Oasys

This blog explores five examples of environments where footfall analysis can be demonstrated effectively.


It is very important to understand how a structure will respond to use. Structural engineers need to answer questions such as, ‘will human induced vibration cause disruption to the occupants of a building or even prevent them from carrying out their professional work?’

Footfall analysis can be the answer to such questions, using structural engineering software programmes like Oasys GSA Building. Whether a structure is built in steel, concrete or timber, GSA Building is the ultimate software for obtaining accurate and reliable results when performing footfall analysis.

In this article we will explore five types of environments that require different types of analysis with reference to GSA Building as the ideal software to provide precise, dependable results, meeting specific project requirements.

1. Large Crowds

Arenas and stadiums are often made from steel and are built with extremely large groups of people in mind. For example, audiences at music concerts or sporting events usually dance and sing along to their favourite artists or jump and shout for joy to support their team. Therefore, these types of structures need special requirements when calculating crowd excitation vibrations and so advanced analysis methods should be performed using structural engineering software, such as time history and harmonic analyses with GSA Building.

 
2. Science and accuracy

Laboratories, for example, are usually constructed using concrete for strength and stability as they have exacting requirements for vibration control. This is to ensure the accuracy of their experiments, especially when using sensitive electronic equipment such as microscopes. GSA Building can provide high levels of accuracy and flexibility when calculating human-induced vibration accelerations and velocities.

3. Rhythmic and Crowd Activity

Buildings like sports halls and gyms are typically constructed using steel as they require long beam spans. These types of buildings differ from others when considering human induced vibration as many of the activities carried out are co-ordinated and harmonised. For example, aerobics and dance classes can cause resonance with the natural frequencies of the structure, making the floor bounce. Moreover, weightlifting in a gym can induce transient vibrations from the weights dropping on the floor. GSA Building performs accurately when using both harmonic and time history dynamic response analysis.



4. Health and Human Concern

Like laboratories, hospitals that house operating theatres are often constructed from concrete as they require an extreme level of solidity. It is vital that buildings where lifesaving operations are taking place are carefully considered and are constructed using the highest quality designs. There should be an absolute minimum of vibrations to avoid disturbing surgeons carrying out their meticulous work. By using GSA Building, structural engineers can ensure accuracy in their calculations when designing sensitive floor structures.


5.Quality Builds

Quality builds such as high specification offices, especially those that are constructed using timber, require exact human induced vibration analysis to meet the requirements of client specification. You can see an example of the footfall analysis for retail offices in the GSA model below.


Watch this webinar to learn more: ‘Footfall Analysis with Oasys GSA’.

Additional information

Format:
Blog
Publisher:
IStructE

Tags

Software Blog Assessment of Structures Architecture Conceptual Design Fatigue

Related Resources & Events

Case Study
Blue abstract blocks

EEFIT return mission to Nepal

EEFIT returned to Nepal following the devastating Mw 7.8 earthquake which struck Gorkha, Nepal on 25 April 2015. This talk discusses the recovery, reconstruction and “build back better” approach, analysing both the physical reconstruction and the institutional framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

Date ‐ 6 October 2022
Author ‐ EEFIT
Price ‐ Free
Report
Blue abstract blocks

Optimal design of rubber joints for seismic protection of masonry-infilled frame structures

A report from a project funded by a 2019 EEFIT Research Grant winner.

Date ‐ 2 February 2022
Author ‐ Dr. Enrico Tubaldi, Mr. Prateek Kumar Dhir, Ms. Alessandra Orfeo
Price ‐ Free
Training
Blue abstract blocks

EEFIT remote reconnaissance mission report: 2021 Haiti earthquake

This lecture summarised EEFIT’s response to the Haitian earthquake and reflected the combined remote work with local partners in the field.

Date ‐ 28 January 2022
Author ‐ Michael Whitworth, Joshua Macabuag, Tracy Kijewski-Correa, Luigi Di Sarno, Francesco Pugliese, Kokcan Donmez, Valentina Macchiarulo, Mobin Ojaghi, Fatemeh (Mahtab) Foroughnia, Jacob Black, Alessandra Orfeo and Camilla Penney