Technical Guidance Notes - Level 1 (35-volume package)

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers

Date published

1 March 2014

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Standard: £220.50

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Technical Guidance Notes - Level 1 (35-volume package)

The Structural Engineer
Technical Guidance Notes - Level 1 (35-volume package)
Date published

1 March 2014

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

Price

Standard: £220.50

Member: £0

Buy Now
PDF
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

All Level 1 Technical Guidance Notes (originally published in The Structural Engineer magazine).

A comprehensive reference library for early-stage structural engineering and built environment professionals, comprising:

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Technical Guidance Note (Level 1, No. 12): Reading reinforced concrete drawings

Technical Guidance Note (Level 1, No. 12): Reading reinforced concrete drawings

This Technical Guidance Note explains the way in which reinforced concrete drawings should be read. In many cases reinforced concrete drawings are more diagrammatic than their general arrangement counterparts and carry with them their own unique set of rules and nomenclature. Note that the guidance provided here is based on European codes of practice; for all other regions the reader is directed to local guidelines on reinforced concrete detailing methods. This technical guidance note does not cover the rules governing the detailing reinforced concrete. That is a far more complex subject which is dealt with in The Institution of Structural Engineers’ publication Standard Method of Detailing Structural Concrete (3rd edition).

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This Technical Guidance Note concerns lateral loads that are applied to barriers and wheel axle loads from vehicles. Barrier loading is dealt with slightly differently to other forms of imposed loading. The nature of the loading can vary from people leaning against barriers to vehicles colliding with them at speed. Axle loading from vehicles has to be treated somewhat differently to other forms of imposed loading. While it is possible to assume a blanket area load to represent them, it is the point load from each wheel that needs closer attention.

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This Technical Guidance Note concerns the concept of notional loading, which the Eurocodes classifies as Equivalent Horizontal Forces. These are loads that exist due to inaccuracies and imperfections introduced into the structure during its construction. The following text explains how notional lateral loads are incorporated into the design process. (This article was updated in October 2016 to reflect errata issued since its original publication.)

Date - 1 March 2012
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