Correspondence Dynamic Effects in Railway Bridges
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Correspondence Dynamic Effects in Railway Bridges

The Structural Engineer
Correspondence Dynamic Effects in Railway Bridges
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

SIR,-. Kent’s comments relating to my communication on “Dynamic Effects in Railway Bridges," published in the November number of The Structural Engineer, are very much to the point, but I think he is perhaps unduly pessimistic. There is no getting away from the fact that the state of oscillation in a bridge, when synchronism is encountered, is governed to a large extent by those somewhat elusive characteristics, damping in the bridge and damping in the spring movement of the locomotive; but it should not be impossible to assign numerical values to the coefficients prescribing those characteristics with a degree of accuracy sufficient for all practical purposes.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 2

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