The Erection of Heavy Drums

Author: Noble, George

Date published

N/A

First published: N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

The Erection of Heavy Drums

The Structural Engineer
The Erection of Heavy Drums
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Noble, George

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

WHEN the fist oil well was sunk by Col. Edwin L. Drake in 1859, the chief aim of the oil refiners from then until the late nineties, when the automobile made its appearance, was the production of paraffin or lamp oil, and all the by-products were surreptitiously emptied into any near-by creek or river, as being the easiest way of disposing of this residue, which was of no apparent use. George Noble

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 2

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
A River Wall in Reinforced Concrete Discussion on Mr. Andrew Hood's Paper

A River Wall in Reinforced Concrete Discussion on Mr. Andrew Hood's Paper

The CHAIRMAN (Mr. Ewart S . Andrews, Vice- President) said that seldom had the work described in a paper been so well illustrated as in this case by lantern slides. He suggested that speakers in the discussion might with advantage express their views as to the manner in which one could calculate the resistance to an anchor block such as was shown in the type B construction referred to in the paper, to which anchor block the large tension rods were attached.

Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
A Conception of the Creep of Unreinforced Concrete, and an Estimation of the Limiting Values

A Conception of the Creep of Unreinforced Concrete, and an Estimation of the Limiting Values

It is well known that the loading of certain -materials produces not only an initial and immediate strain, but also a further deformation which continues to increase with t'ime, although the applied load is unaltered. Just as a block of pitch flows continuously under the action of a load which may be merely its own weight, so, in varying degrees of magnitude, is the phenomenon noticeable in other materials such as cement, concrete, stone and wood, when they are maintained under constant load. F.G. Thomas

Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
The Lay-Out and Construction of Sports Grounds and Grand Stands

The Lay-Out and Construction of Sports Grounds and Grand Stands

DURING the last few years the term "Stadia" has frequently been used in describing sports enclosures. It is derived from the old Greek word " Stadium," which originally applied to the foot race course at Olympia. This structure was erected in the 3rd century, B.C., and was 630 feet in length, with two parallel tiers of stone seats along each side, joined at one end by a semicircular curve. It is interesting to note that the distance between the two end pylons measured 606.75 feet, and that this was afterwards adopted by the Romans as a measure of distance, eight "Stadia" being equal to one Roman Mile. James Reed

Author - Reed, James
Price - £9