Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork. Report of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the
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Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork. Report of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the

The Structural Engineer
Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork. Report  of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

In May and June of 1931 a series of tests was carried out by the Masonry Sectional Committee of the Institution’s Science Committee to determine the effect of Steel Bearing Plates in spreading the reaction load of a beam on to a brick wall. The results, published in The Structural Engineer of February, 1932, and subsequently issued in pamphlet form, showed that the effect of a thin plate was very small, and that, unless plates considerably thicker than those customarily used were provided, some other substitute for a padstone must be sought, or the load restricted to about 15 tons per sq. ft. of actual bearing area of the joist flange on the wall.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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