Lay-Out, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports. Discussion on Mr. H.E. Brooke-Bradley's
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Lay-Out, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports. Discussion on Mr. H.E. Brooke-Bradley's

The Structural Engineer
Lay-Out, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports. Discussion on Mr. H.E. Brooke-Bradley's
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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Mr. C.J. JACKAMAN (Member of Council) said that the Institution was very greatly indebted to the author of this Paper. He had listened with great appreciation to what the author had said, and it had given rise to a number of questiom in his mind, which he would refrain from asking because there would not be time to answer them. But the author had covered many if not all the most salient features relating to aerodromes. His paragraph headed "A Nationa1 Necessity" was most opportune, as were also his remarks on accessibility.

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