The New President
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The New President


The Structural Engineer
The New President
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

DR. OSCAR FABER, O.B.E., whose name is so well known in the sphere of structural engineering and whom we welcome as our new President, first joined the Institution (then the Concrete Institute) in 1911.

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 6

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