Mechanical Painting - II. Modern Types of Appliances
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Mechanical Painting - II. Modern Types of Appliances

The Structural Engineer
Mechanical Painting - II. Modern Types of Appliances
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

PAINT spraying machinery has been developed along somewhat divergent lines, but for our present purpose it is not necessary to dwell upon those types which have been designed for the finer kinds of decorative work. Our immediate concern is with painting the heavier forms of buildings, girders and stanchions, large expanses of concrete and the like.

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 4

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