The British Empire Exhibition at Wembley

Author: Harvey, W

Date published

N/A

First published: N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

The British Empire Exhibition at Wembley

The Structural Engineer
The British Empire Exhibition at Wembley
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Harvey, W

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Unlike the great exhibition of 1851, where a colossal experiment in constructional engineering in glass and iron reacted upon the building methods of the whole civilised world, the far larger exhibition at Wembley is in some respects less ambitious and clings fairly closely to the normal methods of design and construcfion. Colour is also lacking, and the British Empire Exhibition is probably the first in which the principal palaces have been left in the unpalatial and retiring hue of dingy grey. Adequate performance of function should take precedence over artistic presentation, and the vast crowds at Wembley view the exhibits in reasonable comfort. W. Harvey

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 8

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
Students' Bureau

Students' Bureau

As announced in our last issue we propose, in conjunction with the Bennett College, Sheffield, to publish each month a simple problem in Graphic Statics, for the best solution of which the Governor of the Bennett College will award a prize of 10s. In allotting points, neatness will receive the same consideration as accuracy.

Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Structural Applications of Concrete Staves in America

Structural Applications of Concrete Staves in America

One of the most versatile and utilitarian buliding products developed in America during the last fifteen years is the concrete stave. This unit is in reality a small flat slab, usually about 30 inches long, 10 to 14 inches wide and 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches thick, but it is known as a stave because it is laid up end on end, usually on construction such as tanks, where it replaces the wood stave. A.J.R. Curtis

Author - Curtis, A J R
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
The Strength of Concrete; its Relation to the Cement, Aggregates, and Water - Part IV

The Strength of Concrete; its Relation to the Cement, Aggregates, and Water - Part IV

V.-CONCRETES AT BASIC WATER CONTENT. Several tests were made at basic water content using 25 F.A. mixed in three proportions, the ratios of cement to mixed aggregate by bulk being approximately 1:8, 1:5, and 1:2 1/2 or 3. J. Singleton-Green

Price - £9