A Short History of Harbour Engineering
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A Short History of Harbour Engineering

The Structural Engineer
A Short History of Harbour Engineering
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

FROM THE TIME when men first ventured to use the sea as a means of communication, safe harbours have been as necessary as sound ships. At first, safe havens were used whenever nature provided them, the minimum requirement being shelter and ease of access with, if possible, convenient beaches to haul small craft out of the water. J. P. M. PANNELL

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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