Winter 1962-63
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Winter 1962-63

The Structural Engineer
Winter 1962-63
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The winter of 1962-63 was in many parts of England and particularly in the south and west the most severe in living memory and in some areas temperatures fell below any previously recorded. Snowfalls were particularly heavy and the depth and weight of fallen snow added a further unusual hazard for many weeks.

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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