Acceptance Criteria of Concrete (With Particular Reference to Small Projects)
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Acceptance Criteria of Concrete (With Particular Reference to Small Projects)

The Structural Engineer
Acceptance Criteria of Concrete (With Particular Reference to Small Projects)
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Concrete is a variable material. Judgment of concrete acceptability is consequently probabilistic. The acceptance criteria stipulated in the British Codes as well as the ACI Code are reviewed. The efficiency of the respective acceptance tests is examined by means of the operating Characteristic curves. It is shown that the criteria of acceptance stipulated in ACI 318-77 involve a high risk of accepting substandard concrete (consumer’s risk), while the CP 114 criteria for designed mixes involve a high risk of rejecting good quality concrete (producer ’S risk). The CP 110 criteria involve a reasonably low level of risks to the two parties. However, the test is suitable for continuous assessment of concrete quality in large projects, but less efficient in small projects where concreting is performed at intermittent periods. The BS 5328 criteria, though applicable to small projects, result in a varying distribution of risk between the producer and the consumer, depending on the variability of the concrete. A set of acceptance criteria more suitable for small projects is proposed. The proposed criteria involve a level of risks similar to that of CP 110. H.W. Chung

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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