The Granary Site - Design and Construction of a Mechanised Letter-Sorting Office
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The Granary Site - Design and Construction of a Mechanised Letter-Sorting Office


The Structural Engineer
The Granary Site - Design and Construction of a Mechanised Letter-Sorting Office
Date published

N/A

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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

This paper describes the design and construction of a district postal sorting office in North West London. The earlier use of the site and its location in relation to the Regent's Canal gave rise to the need for special consideration of the substructure. Particular reference is made to the problems arising from the removal of a former railway embankment and the soil movements likely to result. The way in which the design was developed in stages from feasibility to construction is described. K.C. White, A.P. Myers and A.H. Dutton

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 4

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