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The Structural Engineer

Introduction-problems Civil engineers encounter impact problems on a great variety of occasions -vehicle impact against bridge piers and columns -rockshelter structures over roads in mountain areas -ship impact on sea platforms -aeroplane crashes on nuclear power plants -gas explosions in buildings Professor Dr. Ing J. Eibl

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The Structural Engineer

(1) Following a review of the Associate-Membership grade, conducted in 1985, Council have agreed to the introduction, for a limited time period, of a scheme to enable those who hold suitable minimum academic standards (namely, an HNC or equivalent), are 40 years of age or more, and have 20 years’ experience, to seek proper recognition. It is recognised that many provide a valuable contribution to structural design and practice but are not yet in membership, which is of concern to chartered and technician colleagues.

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The Structural Engineer

Most structural engineers enjoy a challenge, particularly when they can produce a unique or innovatory solution to that challenge. Successful innovation is beneficial for the engineers involved and for other engineers who can observe and learn from that application. In that way, the frontiers of knowledge are advanced and the successful innovations become proven practice within the parameters of the experience gained. For the engineer introducing the innovation, there are several aspects: -is the engineer aware that a change is being made from previous practice? -have the implications of the change or innovation been considered? -is there sufficient data to substantiate the change or innovation? -is a development programme needed to support the proposals? -is there a course of action which can be adopted in the event that the change or innovation does not give the specified service to the client? -is the engineer likely to be held responsible for additional costs because of unsatisfactory performance resulting from the change or innovation? D.W. Quinion

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The Structural Engineer

Lifecycle costing assesses the total cost of a building over its life, including initial and running costs. By implication it permits one to establish a reasonable balance between these to meet a brief. This requires an assessment and cost forecasts, at design stage, of the significant elements likely to influence running costs. S.B. Tietz

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The Structural Engineer

Britain has a long history of being prolific in invention and innovation but of allowing other countries to capitalise commercially on many of our best ideas. Over the last 40 years, it is clear that the real commercial return has gone not to those countries who have been the first to introduce a new product, but to those who have made well-established products available to a world market-e.g. cars, planes, refrigerators, washing machines, computers, and videos. The Rt. Hon. Dr. David Owen, MP

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The Structural Engineer

Designing buildings is exciting and constructing them onerous. After the stimulus and the fatigue, there is little inclination to investigate the performance of the completed work or compare it with that predicted. Sadly, investigation usually takes place only when failure is catastrophic or litigation by a dissatisfied client is in hand. Few professional firms or building owners undertake systematic investigation of building failures or monitor the performance of their buildings as a matter of course. G.H. Hutton

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The Structural Engineer

The paper describes i he eva rluation of engineering design, design management, and construction, of the Diplomatic Club, a new building of floor area 24 000 m2, in Riyadh. Professor E. Happold, T.A. Ealy, J.W.E. Pugh and R.H. Webster

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The Structural Engineer

The Western Counties Branch was privileged to receive the President and Secretary of the Institution at the inaugural meeting on 10 October 1986. Professor Happold’s address was full of interest and, at the end, he turned the tables on the Branch by setting certain questions. The first was to ask for suggestions on how our standing in society could be improved, i.e. how to improve public appreciation of structural engineers; another, what we would like to see in The Structural Engineer. The two questions are closely related to two other matters of considerable importance to us all, i.e. CPD and closer working relationships. D.R. Wardle

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The Structural Engineer

Tensile stresses in concrete Several of our readers have commented on the reservations expressed by Mr V. T. Pannell, which we supported, regarding the ability of concrete to resist tensile stress; these appeared last July and were discussed further in October, when Mr R. 0. C. Seaman wrote to us. We have now heard further from Mr Seaman: Further to my previous letter and the reservations expressed about the application of concrete in tension, I would quote in further support of my contention, Table 11 of Civil Engineering Code of Practice no. 2: Earth retaining structures, which gives recommended permissible tensile stresses for mass concrete in flexure of 40 lb/in2 (0.3 N/mm2) for a 1:2:4 mix.

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