A Retrospect of a Scottish Experience
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A Retrospect of a Scottish Experience

The Structural Engineer
A Retrospect of a Scottish Experience
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

I was surprised and a little awestruck when the Scottish Branch requested me to write on the above theme. However, the Branch conjures up so many happy and fulfilling memories that the request could not be gainsaid.

W.G.N. Geddes

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Feature Issue 5

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