The Structural Aspects of the Great Pyramid

Author: Davidson, D

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The Structural Aspects of the Great Pyramid


The Structural Engineer
The Structural Aspects of the Great Pyramid
Date published

N/A

Author

Davidson, D

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now
Author

Davidson, D

When I submitted the title of my paper it was my intention to limit my discussion to the design and construction of the Great Pyramid from the standpoint of the engineer designing and from the standpoint of the contractor building the structure. When, however, I came to the drafting of my thesis, I found that certain principles of design, and the generally high standard of excellence attained in the practical application of these principles required a fuller technical treatment. My paper would have been interesting enough without this fuller treatment. It would have failed, however, to establish as definitely intentional the principles of design to which I have referred. D. Davidson

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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