A Practical Method for the Design of I Beams Haunched in Concrete

Author: Caughey, Robert A;Scott, W Basil

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A Practical Method for the Design of I Beams Haunched in Concrete

The Structural Engineer
A Practical Method for the Design of I Beams Haunched in Concrete
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Caughey, Robert A;Scott, W Basil

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The demand for fire-resisting construction in inside work and for the protection of outside work from the weather has resulted in the general practice of encasing structural steelwork in concrete. In addition, the concrete encasement of steel beams is frequently extended laterally to form parts of a structure, such as floors. Robert A. Caughey and W. Basil Scott

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 8

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