Asphalt as a Vibration Absorbent

Author: Digby, W P;Fairthorne, R B

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Asphalt as a Vibration Absorbent

The Structural Engineer
Asphalt as a Vibration Absorbent
Date published

N/A

Author

Digby, W P;Fairthorne, R B

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Digby, W P;Fairthorne, R B

Sir Courtauld Thomson, chairman of the Limmer and Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company,
in his speech at the annual general meeting in March, referred to the attention the company’s staff was paying to the problem of vibration, and the writers, who have worked in collaboration with the company’s staff, are now able to reproduce some results of experiments recently carried out.

W.P. Digby and R.B. Fairthorne

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 9

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