Welding Economy and Efficiency in Mechanical Maintenance

Author: Brett, C W

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Welding Economy and Efficiency in Mechanical Maintenance


The Structural Engineer
Welding Economy and Efficiency in Mechanical Maintenance
Date published

N/A

Author

Brett, C W

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now
Author

Brett, C W

At first glance it may appear somewhat absurd to talk to Structural Engineers, or, indeed, any engineer, about welding or the high temperature treatment of modern industrial metals; most members of the engineering profession are more or less familiar with the theory and main principles governing the use of one or other of the half dozen fusive agents now universally employed by the specialist, but one finds quite commonly that an impression exists that welding has positive and well-defined limitations, or that its employment is only possible in certain classes of work and in relation to the union of certain metals. This prejudice is so widespread that it may be well at, the outset to assert without qualification that, in mechanical repairs and reconstructions and in the recreation of any of the industrial metals, there is practically no limit to its application. The idea, no doubt, had its origin in the unfortunate experience a certain number who have been the victims of incompetent operators, who have either failed to do what was required to be done or have employed an unsuitable process or fusive agent, with the inevitable result that the unit or member treated has lost efficiency or been irreparably damaged. C.W. Brett

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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