Forth Road Bridge Preliminary Report Under Consideration
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Forth Road Bridge Preliminary Report Under Consideration


The Structural Engineer
Forth Road Bridge Preliminary Report Under Consideration
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

The preliminary report by Mott, Hay and Anderson, consulting engineers, of Westminster, to the Ministry of Transport regarding a proposed road bridge over the Forth at Queensferry has been sent to the local authorities for consideration. The report recommends that the bridge be constructed about a mile dwnstream from the railway bridge, the cost being estimated at £5,570,000 or £6,110,000, according to the route selected for the north approach. A bridge of the suspension type and having a main span of 2,400 ft. with a minimum clearance of 150 ft.-the same as the Forth Bridge-is recommended. The report states thathe present railway bridge was completed in 1889 and was located at the narrowest part of the river, advantage being taken of the rocky island of Inch-Garvie for the site of one of the main piers. It therefore occupies the best position in this stretch of the river. The bridge consists of a main span of 2,400 ft., with a minimum clearance above H.W.O.S.T. of 150 ft. This clearance is the same as that of the Forth Bridge, but while in the case of that bridge the clearance rapidly diminishes under the cantilevers, in the proposed bridge the clearance is maintained under the whole span. The side spans are each 1,040 ft. with clearance above H.W.O.S.T., diminishing from about 150 ft.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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