Branch Viewpoints. The Structural Steel-to-Concrete Interface
Date published

N/A

First published: N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

Branch Viewpoints. The Structural Steel-to-Concrete Interface


The Structural Engineer
Branch Viewpoints. The Structural Steel-to-Concrete Interface
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

The part of a building or structure that often gives the greatest difficulty in design and construction is the interface between structural steel and concrete. This may occur in new build or refurbishment work. The requirements for one engineer to have overall responsibility for all of the structure are well known. But the steelwork details are often prepared by a subcontractor, and there can be difficulties in making connections to concrete construction completed by another subcontractor. Peter H. Handley

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 17

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
Behaviour of Connections in Frames of Fibre-Reinforced-Polymer Section

Behaviour of Connections in Frames of Fibre-Reinforced-Polymer Section

Five tests on frame subassemblies have been conducted to study the behaviour of flange cleated connections made of fibre-reinforced-polymer section. Full-size beam-to-column members jointed by bolting and bonding were tested to failure. All members were made by the pultrusion process. A.J. Bass and J.T. Mottram

Author - Bass, A J;Mottram, J T
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Academia. The Changing Academic Scene

Academia. The Changing Academic Scene

The recent explosion in the number of universities provides an opportune occasion to reflect briefly on the changes that have taken place in academia generally and in structural engineering at the University of Birmingham in particular. The accelerating pace of change has become especially marked in the last decade and this is well illustrated by the changes which have taken place within civil engineering at Birmingham. Not least among these changes was the transition in 1988 from a Department to a School when Civil Engineering became a budget centre responsible for all its own staff costs, for example, and the newly formed School manifestly displayed a financial accountability comparable with any large department within an industrial organisation. Professor B.P. Hughes and Professor L.A. Clark

Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
CPD

CPD

I remember sitting on the Midland Counties Branch Committee some years ago when the subject of continuing professional development was first raised. The general reaction was an ‘Oh my God another imposition on the poor long-suffering engineer’ followed by ‘Surely anyone who wants to progress has to develop, and good professionals certainly make an effort to keep up to date’. Recently I read a letter in the NCE that made the second point yet again, and while I recognise that there is a deal of truth in the premise, it does miss the point. S.G. Evans

Price - £9