Limit State at 40: New Beginning or Midlife Crisis?
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Limit State at 40: New Beginning or Midlife Crisis?

The Structural Engineer
Limit State at 40: New Beginning or Midlife Crisis?
Date published

N/A

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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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The development of limit state design, based on partial safety factors, began in earnest with the formation of the European Committee for Concrete (CEB) in 1953. As far as many engineers are concerned, the limit state revolution is now all but over: permissible stress design is still in use, but most new Codes worldwide are based on the partial factor approach and it forms the basis of all the new draft structural Eurocodes.

A.N. Beal

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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