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Issue 23/24


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The Structural Engineer

Mr R. J. M. Sutherland (F) What struck me at the end is that no new ideas are coming out of calculation. Is not that what you are saying? I have been trying to think of some new ideas that derive from mathematics rather than from concepts relating to the way things have worked. Can you think of any?

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The Structural Engineer

Part 3: introduction This year’s examination was attempted by a total of 818 Candidates, a slight increase in comparison with last year. Of those candidates, 462 took the examination in the UK while there were 356 candidates overseas. The UK pass-rate was most satisfactory, 51.7% compared with 38.8% in 1994; there were, however, 49 candidates fewer. The oversea candidate figure of 356 can be split between the Hong Kong centre and a further 35 centres each accommodating between l-10 candidates. In Hong Kong the number of candidates was 272, an increase of 41 compared with 1994 the pass-rate, however, dropped by 5.5% to 30.9%. Amongst the other 84 oversea candidates, only 17 achieved a pass which produced a poor pass-rate of 20.2%. The Institution makes a considerable effort to provide candidates with local examination venues. In the past few years centres have been provided in the British Virgin Islands, Hanoi, Khartoum and Katmandu, proving the worldwide appeal of the Institution’s chartered membership examination. The overall pass-rate this year was a respectable 41.6% - an increase of 3.8% compared with last year. The most popular question

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The Structural Engineer

Fresh impetus is being imparted by both Government and industry in a field of policy that construction has in the past found difficult to resolve - how to fund an expanding programme of innovation, research and development. John D. Allen

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The Structural Engineer

There can be no doubt that Japan is amongst the world leaders in bridge design and construction. This is true in terms of number of bridges built, spans achieved to date, and technical knowledge. By the end of the century Japan will hold the world record for both suspended and cable-stayed spans (the Akaishi Bridge at 1990m and the Tatara Bridge at 890m, respectively). It has been estimated that over one-third of all the cable-stay bridges in the world are in Japan. It is also likely that, with a well-developed hightech engineering base, a still-powerful economy and a natural geography which still contains numerous as-yet uncrossed straits and valleys, Japan’s eminence in this sphere is likely to remain strong for the foreseeable future. This paper aims to outline some of the reasons behind this development and in particular to highlight current trends and projects which illustrate the state of Japan’s bridge-building industry. M.M. Lenczner

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The Structural Engineer

After graduatingfrom Cambridge, Jo da Silva spent a year living in India before joining Ove Arup & Partners where she has spent the last 5 years working as a structural engineer. She spent 18 months in Hong Kong designing the Terminal Building for the new airport with architect Sir Norman Foster & Partners. Currently, she is part of a team investigating the NATM collapse at Heathrow Airport and is also refurbishing a Victorian boathouse in London. She received the ‘Young Consulting Engineer of the Year Award 1995’. She has been a member of RedR for 4 years and is also on RedR's Management Committee. Friday afternoon, 29 April 1994. The yellow ‘post it’ note stuck to my telephone simply said ‘call RedR’. Ten days later I was in Tanzania working for the Irish Aid Agency CONCERN, helping tens of thousands of refugees who had fled the massacres taking place in Rwanda.I was located in Karagwe District, possibly the remotest corner of Tanzania, sandwiched between Lake Victoria, Uganda and Rwanda. J. da Silva

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The Structural Engineer

This paper describes a series of tests on reinforced concrete beams and develops an analytical model for calculating the shear strength of members with low shear spans. The model is extended to quantify the influence of link spacing on the shear strength cfmembers with links. D.E. Parker and P.J.M. Bullman

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The Structural Engineer

The movements and strains which take place in masonry arches, and the way in which those strains lead to longitudinal cracks, are described. Some traditional views are considered to be untenable. The causes of the cracks have some implications for assessment and repair: Observations are made on the repair of cracks. Professor W.J. Harvey

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The Structural Engineer

Codes of Practice Stan Lawrence reminds us of the origins of the change from elastic theory to limit stutes theory in the BS Codes and writes: Bearing in mind the present climate of discontent and concern over Codes and regulations, it is understandable that solutions are being considered. One has recently surfaced in a disguised form requesting a return to the elastic theory as a permitted design method. Verulam

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