Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete: the Influence of Shear Span
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Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete: the Influence of Shear Span

The Structural Engineer
Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete: the Influence of Shear Span
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This paper describes a series of tests on reinforced concrete beams and develops an analytical model for calculating the shear strength of members with low shear spans. The model is extended to quantify the influence of link spacing on the shear strength cfmembers with links.

D.E. Parker and P.J.M. Bullman

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 23/24

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