Added to basket

Contents page

The Structural Engineer

In my first feature comparing CP32 and BS 6399: Part 23 I focused on misapplication of the CP3 rules for changes of roughness as the principal reason that BS 6399: Part 2 is erroneously perceived to give larger loads than CP3. However, there is one change between the two Codes that does tend to increase structural loads and that is the modification of the ‘division by parts’ rule - clause 5.5.2 of CP3 and clause 2.2.3.2 of BS 6399: Part 2. N.J. Cook

Publish Date - N/A

Author – Cook, N J

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Few would dispute that construction projects generate more documents, and in particular secondary copies of documents, than are strictly necessary to get the work done. Whatever the reasons for this (and ritual abuse of the photocopier is clearly one), on completion of a project consultants need to decide how to deal with the voluminous documentation which has been generated. So what should you do? A. Rawstron

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

This article reports experience on a number of lattice-shell roof structures we have designed recently. We are referring to structures where an open lattice is curved, either singly or doubly, so as to be able to carry load in a combination of in- and out-of-plane actions. Some published guidance on analysis exists, as do some reports on built projects which appear to have been determined by purely structural considerations. There is, however, little guidance on where to begin the design or, perhaps more importantly, what will constitute an acceptable end to the design of architecture-led projects. The choice of form for any structure must clearly address a number of issues to which the designer has to attach priority: - what space has to be enclosed? -how should the load be carried across that space? - the integration of technical subsystems into the structural arrangement - issues of overall economy -further issues, sometimes subsidiary, such as thermal performance, fire, acoustics, maintenance and daylighting M.W. Manning and P. Dallard

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The paper describes the design and construction of the Trafford Centre, a major regional shopping and leisure centre on the outskirts of Manchester. It contains 140 OOO m² of shops and related facilities set within a landscaped site adjacent to the M63 motorway. Parking for 10 000 cars is provided. The superstructure contains over 16 OOOt of structural steel. There are simply supported beam and column arrangements, with complex lateral bracing to provide free access to malls and shops. Fast-track parallel working between the client, the design team, the management contractol; and the subcontractors, is an essential feature. The ability to control and accommodate change, sometimes after the structure was complete, occurred as the design developed and tenant needs were clarified. Over 30M persons will visit the centre each year. D.A. Woodward and I.B. Povall

Publish Date - N/A

Author – Woodward, D A;Povall, I B

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Engineers’ salaries The comments by Mike Heath, Director General of the Engineering Council referred to in ‘Structural news ’ for 4 November 1997, has raised more correspondence. Mr E. N. Carmichael has written from Bridgnorth in Shropshire in response to the anonymous letter published in Verulam, 20 January 1998: I am moved to respond to the question raised by Verulam as a result of an anonymous correspondent on the validity of average salaries claimed to be £40 131 p.a.

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9